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Fujian Province, China
Spring Harvest 2013

Tie Guan Yin (Iron Buddha)

£1.25

Fujian Province, China
Spring Harvest 2013

Tie Guan Yin (Iron Buddha)

£1.25

Tie Guan Yin is another tea that, depending on where you are, is know by many different names including: Iron Buddha; Iron Goddess of Mercy; Ti Kwan Yin and several others. However, what remains constant is the fact that this tea is among China's finest, and probably its most well known oolong - no matter what it's called.

As with most of China's famous teas there are beautiful legends that describe their origin. Tie Guan Yin is no exception.

The most widely know legend involves a poor farmer in Anxi County, Mr Wei, who became disheartened by the state of an old temple that contained an Iron statue of the empress and bodhisattva Guanyin. With no money to repair the temple he chose to clean it himself, and as a small offering burn incense in her honour. He continued doing this for many months until one night Guanyin appeared to him in a dream and told him that behind the temple, in a cave, there was a treasure which he was to share with others.

When he went to the cave he found nothing but a small tea plant that he took to his own field and cared for until it grew into a large bush. He then shared cuttings from this plant with his neighbours who all began producing the finest tea which they called Tie Guan Yin. The farmers prospered as word spread they were selling such an exquisite tea and, with the money they made, the temple was repaired and became one of the most beautiful in the region.


  • A sweet honey note, lively florals with a smooth buttery finish.
  • Our Tie Guan Yin comes from a small farm in Anxi County, Fujian Province. It has an incredible sweet pea aroma that gives way to the brightest notes of honey suckle sweetness and supremely smooth rounded florals. These flavours continue to develop over multiple infusions and leave a delicious, sweet buttery aftertaste.

    This tea was found for us by a friend in China and I first bought it for our online tea shop in 2012 simply based on his description - without actually trying it first - however, I am delighted I took this risk. This truly is one of the finest examples of a spring harvest Tie Guan Yin any of us at driftwood have ever tried.

    James

  • Longer & Less - for a European style of brewing Tie Guan Yin I would recommend using: 

    1 flat tsp (3g) of loose leaf tea per person into a pot of around 90º water. (Allow freshly boiled water to stand for 1 minutes) Infuse for around 2 minutes. For subsequent infusions increase the time by 1 minute each round. 

    Can be infused 2 or 3 times this way. 

    Shorter & More - for a traditional Asian (Gong Fu) style of brewing Tie Guan Yin I would recommend using: 

    1tbsp (7g) of loose leaf tea with around 150ml of 90º water. (Allow freshly boiled water to stand for 1 minutes) Infuse for around 35 seconds. For subsequent infusions increase the time by 20-30 seconds each round. 

    Can be infused 5 or 6 times this way.